Lowndes Way, Winslow, Buckingham, Buckinghamshire, MK18 3EN

Phonics

Little Wandle Letters and Sounds Revised

At Winslow Church of England School, we have recognised the importance of teaching a fully Systematic, Synthetic Phonics (SSP) programme in Early Years and Key Stage 1. We believe that all of our children, regardless of their backgrounds, can become fluent readers and writers through an accessible and engaging approach to teaching phonics and reading. This is why we are implementing the Little Wandle: Letters and Sounds Revised Programme.

As a school, we are committed to making early reading and phonics a priority. Therefore, we are currently in a period of transition and have just begun our journey with Little Wandle: Letters and Sounds Revised. Our foci over the next half term is to ensure all Early Years and KS1 teachers and LSAs are fully trained in the new programme, that we are equipped with high quality and consistent resources and we implement the use of matched decodable reading books to support phonics teaching and learning.

Collins Big Cat for Little Wandle

At Winslow Church of England School, we understand just how imperative it is for children to apply their learnt phonics knowledge to read fully matched decodable reading books. We have recently purchased Collins Big Cat for Little Wandle decodable readers which fully match to the Little Wandle SSP Programme.

We are currently in the process of auditing our current Big Cat for Letters and Sounds book stock to ensure the children follow the correct progression to carefully and consistently match our new SSP Programme.

What is phonics?

Phonics is the way we teach children to read by recognising the connections between the sounds of spoken words (phonemes) and the letters in written or typed words (graphemes). 

A phoneme is the smallest unit of sound that can be identified in words. For example in the word ‘cat’ the phonemes are /c/a/t/. In the word ‘shock’ the phonemes are /sh/o/ck/.

A grapheme is a written letter or a group of written letters used to represent a phoneme. Sometimes, one phoneme can have several graphemes. For example, in the word ‘rain’ the /ai/ phoneme is written as ‘ai’. However, in the word ‘play’ the /ai/ phoneme is written as ‘ay’.